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The Memorial Day weekend marking the unofficial start of summer in the U.S. meant big crowds at beaches and warnings from authorities Sunday about people disregarding the coronavirus social-distancing rules and risking a resurgence of the scourge that has killed nearly 100,000 Americans.

Meanwhile, the White House broadened its travel ban against countries hard hit by the virus by saying it would deny admission to foreigners who have recently been in Brazil.

Sheriff’s deputies and beach patrols tried to make sure people kept their distance from others as they soaked up the rays on the sand and at parks and other recreation sites around the country.

In the Tampa area along Florida’s Gulf Coast, the crowds were so big that authorities took the extraordinary step of closing parking lots because they were full.

On the Sunday talk shows, Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, said she was “very concerned” about scenes of people crowding together over the weekend.

“We really want to be clear all the time that social distancing is absolutely critical. And if you can’t social distance and you’re outside, you must wear a mask,” she said on ABC’s “This Week.”

In Missouri, …

The EU flags are seen in front of the Berlaymont, the EU Commission headquarter on May 19, 2020, in Brussels, Belgium.

Thierry Monasse

Tech giants could be forced to pay higher taxes in Europe as governments search for new revenue to deal with the ongoing coronavirus crisis, three experts told CNBC.

Taxing tech firms such as Google, Facebook or Amazon has been a thorny subject in Europe. Countries failed to come up with a joint digital tax in 2019 and deferred the negotiations to the OECD (the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In addition, some nations, such as France, decided to implement their own digital taxes regardless, but their actions sparked a trade spat with the United States.

Different governments are now dealing with the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and they will need fresh cash to support their economies. They might look at tech firms for that extra revenue. 

“We see digital goods/services tax conversations advancing most rapidly in Europe, where the scale of ambition to use the EU budget to finance economic recovery from coronavirus may see Brussels taking an increased interest in the attractive potential tax base of e-commerce and digital