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The gig economy was booming even before the coronavirus pandemic hit. About 36 percent of Americans were involved in the gig economy in 2017 and, since then, the numbers have only risen. Now, as unemployment numbers hit record highs, people are left to determine their own paths. Getting involved with a side hustle is one of the best ways to navigate this crisis. Launching your own business from home may sound daunting, but it’s not as difficult as you may think. Especially after you’ve gotten help from The Complete Side Hustle Hacker Bundle.

This 16-hour bundle is designed to help free you from the necessity of an employer, helping you to build and grow your own profitable business from scratch. The seven-course bundle focuses on an array of

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Goldman Sachs Group Inc. has effectively bowed to pressure from the continuing rally in U.S. stocks and abandoned its call for another steep sell-off.

Strategists led by David Kostin have rolled back their prediction that the S&P 500 would slump to the 2,400 level — over 20% below Friday’s 3,044 close — and now see downside risks capped at 2,750. The U.S. equity benchmark could even rally further to 3,200, they wrote in a May 29 note.

“The powerful rebound means our previous three-month target of 2,400 is unlikely to be realized,” the strategists wrote. “Monetary and fiscal policy support limit likely downside to roughly 10%. Investor positioning has oscillated between neutral and low and is a possible 5% upside catalyst.”

The shift came just after JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s strategists shifted in the other direction — reining in their bullish outlook. JPMorgan’s Marko Kolanovic warned about rising U.S.-China tensions in a note May 28.

Goldman’s strategists maintained their year-end target of 3,000 for the benchmark U.S. stock gauge.

Goldman continues to argue that short-term returns are skewed to the downside — “or neutral at best” — thanks to the risk of an economic, earnings, trade or political “hiccup” to …

Good morning.

For the last three months, I have repeatedly asked, and have been asked, the same question: Will the pandemic accelerate the business community’s move toward stakeholder capitalism? Or slow it down as companies focus on short-term financial pressures?

The answer wasn’t obvious three months ago. But with each passing week, it is becoming more so. Most of the forces that have led to the stakeholder movement have become stronger during the pandemic. Among them:

1. The shift toward talent as the most important source of corporate value has continued. This trend could have been weakened by historic levels of unemployment, which have made labor plentiful. But plentiful labor is not the same as plentiful talent, and the pandemic seems to be leading an increasing number of talent-forward companies to take an “employees first” approach.

2. Demands for systemic change have intensified. The pandemic exposed flaws in our hyper-efficient approach to global markets, and it is deepening the divisions—both within countries and between them—that undercut support for the current economic system. (See Thomas Friedman’s interesting take on this here.) Business leaders need to respond, or risk losing their license to operate.

3. The dearth of leadership is ever …