Join us as we discuss different ways that founders can bring something new to the table and how to pivot existing ideas and concepts in the new normal.

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Got a great business idea? Join Rich Vogel, Founding Partner of venture firm Loeb.nyc, who’ll discuss the importance of nailing your competitive advantage to build a successful new business. Rich will discuss different ways that founders can bring something new to the table, whatever the idea—and how to pivot existing ideas and concepts in the new normal.

During the webinar, Rich will cover:

  • Assess your competition
  • Establish your unique selling proposition
  • Understand your competitive advantage

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*Based on our best-selling book, Start Your Own Business, we have launched a new on-demand start-up course, providing you with a step-by-step guide to starting your own business. Whether you’re ready or just thinking about it, get started for free.

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Dexamethasone, a cheap and widely used steroid, has become the first drug shown to be able to save lives among Covid-19 patients in what scientists hailed as a “major breakthrough”.

Results of trials announced on Tuesday showed dexamethasone, which is used to reduce inflammation in other diseases, reduced death rates by around a third among the most severely ill Covid-19 patients admitted to hospital.

The results suggest the drug should immediately become standard care in patients with severe cases of the pandemic disease, said the researchers who led the trials.

“This is a result that shows that if patients who have Covid-19 and are on ventilators or are on oxygen are given dexamethasone, it will save lives, and it will do so at a remarkably low cost,” said Martin Landray, an Oxford University professor co-leading the trial, known as the RECOVERY trial.

“It’s going to be very hard for any drug really to replace this, given that for less than 50 pounds ($63.26), you can treat eight patients and save a life,” he told reporters in an online briefing.

His co-lead investigator, Peter Horby, said dexamethasone was “the only drug that’s so far shown

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Mary Barra, General Motors CEO and longtime member of Fortune’s Most Powerful Women community, joins Fortune CEO Alan Murray and senior editor Ellen McGirt on this week’s episode of Leadership Next. 

The GM chief made the news for her strongly worded letter to employees mourning the racist killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, among others. In it, she wrote: “Let’s stop asking ‘why’ and start asking ‘what.’ What are we going to do? In this moment, we each must decide what we can do—individually and collectively—to drive change…meaningful, deliberate change.” 

She tells Murray and McGirt that she is an action-oriented engineer, and that as she reflected on these wrongful deaths, she was inspired to ask how her company could drive real change while many other CEOs simply release unactionable statements of solidarity. From that idea sprang the Inclusion Advisory Board, which she said should be completely assembled by the end of June, with the aim of making GM “the most inclusive company in the world.” 

She also said that she is focused on driving that supportive inclusivity not only within GM, but in the communities in which GM operates, within its supply base and in …