Giving potential employees a realistic sense of their first 30 days will help keep them from quitting.

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Peter Voogd talks about the importance of letting potential employees know what to expect if they’re hired. This includes telling them what to expect from your company, both short- and long-term, and what their first will look like financially, emotionally and physically. Incongruent expectations, Voogd explains, cause employees to lose trust in you.

Voogd describes a scenario in network in which a new hire is promised easy opportunities and sales, only to struggle and quit within the first month. In this example, Voogd recommends setting proper expectations, explaining how the first 30 days of the job can be an emotional roller coaster and will challenge the new employee — that they may feel like quitting. By presenting the reality of the effort required to succeed and offering to help, new hires are more likely to persevere.

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Coronavirus stimulus updates: Relief bill stalls, Trump mulls executive order



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The unemployment rate dropped from 11.1% in June to 10.2% in July, as the economy added nearly 1.8 million jobs last month, soundly beating consensus estimates. Equities futures and the dollar gained on the news.

That marks a third straight month of solid hiring and a falling jobless rate after it topped out at 14.7% in April—the highest level since 1940.

This points to an economy that continues to rebound since states began easing lockdowns. The 10.2% unemployment rate, while still weak, comes in far better than the 10.6% consensus estimates of economists compiled by Bloomberg. The improvement will be good news for the White House, but it’s clear it will take years before the U.S. labor market returns to pre-pandemic levels.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) jobs report finds the total number of unemployed Americans stood at 16.3 million in July, much improved from the 23.1 million unemployed in April. But the number of Americans out of work is still around three times greater than the February figure (when 5.8 million were unemployed), and indicates the much hoped for V-shaped recovery is far from likely.

Jobless Americans were receiving an extra $600 per weekly in unemployment …

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Good morning.

Is the COVID crisis busting business bureaucracy? That’s the question I asked business guru Gary Hamel, who has a new book coming out next week entitled Humanocracywhich is his alternative to bureaucracy. I’ve been hearing stories from executives about how work from home has flattened hierarchies, democratized information, impaired micromanagement, focused on outcomes over inputs, and encouraged digitization and innovation.  In the process, has it also weakened corporate inertia andto use Hamel’s subtitle–moved us closer to Creating Organizations as Amazing as the People Inside Them?

Not so fast, says Hamel. “In any crisis, power moves to the periphery,” he says. “By definition, a crisis pushes power out. No hierarchical organization can handle the information processing demands and the decision-making requirements that a crisis presents.” But will the changes last? “We’ve gone through other crises, and typically bureaucracy reasserts itself rather quickly.”

Bureaucracy has been the bane of business leaders for decades. The conversation with Hamel reminded me of this piece I wrote for The Wall Street Journal in 2010, entitled “The End of Management”…