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If you want to judge the true tenor of a company, survey its employees. Do that at Workday, and you’ll find a truly exceptional organization. Year after year, the enthusiasm of employees at the cloud-based software company earn it a spot near the top of Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For.

Credit goes to CEO and co-founder Aneel Bhusri, who is this week’s guest on our podcast, Leadership Next (Apple/Spotify). A sign of his approach to business came shortly after the coronavirus hit. Workday was one of the first to send workers home, but it also gave them each a bonus equal to two weeks’ pay, to help deal with extraordinary expenses. “In a crisis, the first thing you do is fall back on core values,” Bhusri says. “And we’ve always had employees as number one.”

Bhusri is a strong advocate of the stakeholder approach to business. “Companies should have a soul,” he says. “I believe in this environment, companies are stepping up to do the right thing”–for employees, for shareholders, for customers, and for their communities. “Companies …

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday that the Trump administration will soon take action against Chinese software companies, like TikTok and WeChat, that present a risk to national security because they are “feeding data directly to the Chinese Communist Party.”

“President Trump has said ‘enough,’ and we are going to fix it,” Pompeo told Fox News.

Pompeo’s comments followed an odd sequence of events surrounding TikTok, a popular video app owned by a Chinese company, Bytedance. (If you are not a TikTok user, no worries. You can get the gist of it here, and then go on with your life.)

On Friday, President Trump said he was considering banning the app from the U.S. Fox Business reported that Microsoft was in talks to buy the U.S. operations of TikTok, which would both solve the national security concern and enhance Microsoft’s role in social media. (The software giant bought LinkedIn in 2016.) The Wall Street Journal confirmed that story, and put it in the lead position on Saturday’s print front page.

But then late Friday, flying back to Washington …

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The climate crisis has been crowded out in recent months by the health crisis, the economic crisis and the racial justice crisis. (Too many crises.) But needless to say, it hasn’t gone away. Fortune assembled a group of members of its CEO Initiative yesterday, led by Dow CEO Jim Fitterling and Nestle CEO Mark Schneider, to talk about strategies for addressing the problem.

The conversation was held under Chatham House rules, so I can’t report individual comments. What was striking to me about the conversation, though, is this: Until a dozen years ago, the climate change discussion was all about government policy. Indeed, in 2008, the U.S. had two presidential candidates–Barack Obama and John McCain–who both favored a national cap on carbon emissions. Business, at least in the U.S., was then fairly new to the conversation, having only recently been organized by leaders like GE CEO Jeff Immelt and Duke Power CEO Jim Rogers, under the auspices of USCAP. “If we are not at the table, we will be on the menu,” Rogers said, giving the defensive rationale for corporate …

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Let’s talk first about video backgrounds. I liked Sundar Pichai’s the best by far. It was all smooth-credenza sleek, with a few for-show books and that funky chevron-patterned modern artwork on the wall. Jeff Bezos’s book case was nice. Mark Zuckerberg’s boring backdrop explained a man hellbent on domination, not a design aesthetic. Tim Cook’s almost equally boring choice was shocking only because Apple is easily more design-focused than Google, Amazon, or Facebook.

Oh, wait, you came here for analysis about the hearing, not its imagery.

I get that. Little surprised. I actually thought it was a good day for democracy, if not cordiality. Congressional investigators have shown they can dig up dirt on the behemoths that likely will be grist for more focused examiners at the Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission, and in Brussels. But if mergers are to be undone or giants are to be punished for abusing their concentrated power, then Congress will need to write new antitrust laws. (I’d vote for them passing comprehensive …