Join Julie Subotky, founder of Consider it Done, as she discusses her path from doing one-off tasks for clients as a side project, to running multiple businesses for clients across the world.

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2 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Got a side-hustle project and want to turn it into a multi-million dollar enterprise? Join us for our live webinar with Julie Subotky, founder of Consider it Done as she discusses her path from doing one-off tasks for clients as a side project, to running multiple businesses for clients across the world. 

Key takeaways: 

  • How to assess whether your side hustle has potential to be something bigger 
  • How to decide what type of business works for you 
  • How to hire teams, find clients, and scale on a budget

Register Now

Julie Subotky is an entrepreneur, development trainer, and best selling author. Early in her career, she recognized an opportunity to create a business that helped support time-constrained people. Consider it Done empowers a select clientele to live more fully by giving them back their time and helping them maximize their

President Donald Trump admitted Thursday morning that he was intentionally blocking federal funding to the U.S. Postal Service to discourage the use of mail-in ballots in November’s elections.

“Now, they need that money in order to make the post office work, so it can take all of these millions and millions of ballots,” Trump said in an interview with Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo. “Now, if we don’t make a deal, that means they don’t get the money,” he added. “That means they can’t have universal mail-in voting, they just can’t have it.”

The next round of stimulus funding for businesses, local governments and individuals impacted by the virus is being held up largely due to Democrats’ desires to fund the USPS, the president said. House-backed legislation would provide the Postal Service with $25 billion and also undo restrictions imposed on the agency in relation to a $10 billion line of credit recently extended to them by the Treasury.  

Trump’s message comes as rapid changes at the Postal Service have left Americans, politicians and even postal workers and their union representatives scrambling to figure out what’s happening, why it’s happening, and what it all means. 

A slew of of new …

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Good morning. David Meyer here in Berlin, filling in for Alan.

As we head into a much-deserved weekend, I’d like to draw your attention to a couple of worthwhile reads.

The first is this LinkedIn post from HP CEO Enrique Lores, following an appearance before the California Senate yesterday by HP’s strategy chief, Kim Rivera. Rivera was there to express the company’s support for a state bill that would force firms to diversify their boards.

Here’s what Lores had to say on the matter:

“It’s an important piece of legislation. I urge the legislature to adopt it and Governor Newsom to sign it into law. But we shouldn’t have to rely on the Governor’s pen to make our boards more diverse. Business leaders should be doing that on our own.

“This isn’t just the right thing to do. Study after study has shown how gender and ethnic diversity can help power innovation and strengthen a company’s performance. For example, McKinsey has found that companies with more women and more ethnic diversity at the executive level are more profitable, and they’ve also

This is the web version of the Bull Sheet, Fortune’s no-BS daily newsletter on the markets. Sign up to receive it in your inbox here.

Happy Friday, Bull Sheeters. Solid U.S. labor data couldn’t save the Dow and S&P 500 from finishing in the red yesterday. But the benchmark S&P 500 is still up more than 50% since its March lows as it nears a new all-time high. Alas, U.S. futures point to a flat open today.

Let’s check in on the action.

Markets update

Asia

  • The major indexes are mostly higher, with the Shanghai Composite leading the way, up 1.2% in afternoon trade.
  • China’s industrial output continues to crank into high gear, rising 4.8% YOY in July. Elsewhere, China’s retail sales were flat.
  • There are just 48 total active coronavirus cases, but New Zealand isn’t taking any chances. It’s extending a lockdown in Auckland as a 102-day streak of being COVID-free was snapped a few days ago.

Europe

  • The European bourses were down at the open with travel and energy stocks leading the way lower. The benchmark Stoxx Europe 600 dropped 1.6% two hours into the trading session.
  • Daimler shares fell 1.4% in mid-morning trade after

American Airlines passenger planes crowd a runway where they are parked due to flight reductions to slow the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Tulsa International Airport in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. March 23, 2020.

Nick Oxford | Reuters

American Airlines is preparing to scrap flights serving two-dozen medium and small cities as the expiration of federal coronavirus aid that placed restrictions on carriers from cutting service approaches, according to an executive at the carrier.

Airlines are required to maintain minimum levels of service through Sept. 30 under a $25 billion federal aid package that also prohibited layoffs through the end of the third quarter. American was granted $5.8 billion in support under the program.

The deal was meant to preserve both jobs by providing payroll assistance and air service around the country, even though most planes were flying with a fraction of their normal passenger loads. Regulators allowed airlines some exemptions in service.

The new cancellations for up to 30 destinations could show up in fall schedules as early as next week, the American Airlines executive told CNBC. The person asked not to be identified because the changes haven’t been finalized yet.

Airline labor unions and executives from carriers themselves


13 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


There is no one-size-fits-all marketing strategy for businesses. Your product and target customers aren’t the same as everyone else’s, so why would you promote them in the same way? Marketing allows your business to build and maintain long-term relationships with your audience. It’s not a “set and forget,” but an ongoing strategy to help you consistently reach people. A solid marketing strategy informs, engages, sells, and evolves

Marketing is not just advertising. You can’t rely solely on online ads and websites to see real traction. Nor can new startups dive right in without doing the legwork first.

“Marketing significantly influences the overall ‘likeability’ of a business,” says Rachel Sheppard, director of global marketing at Founder Institute. Particularly for emerging companies, it’s essential that you make a good, lasting impression, and start getting leads in—be they optimal or unideal.

With that in mind, here’s how to market your new business, with a few tips from the experts.

Related Link: Sign Up For a Risk-Free Trial of Our On-demand Start Your Own Business Course 

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